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We’re going to the Moon Apollo-style. I’ll bring the Lego…
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We’re going to the Moon Apollo-style. I’ll bring the Lego…

This is Ali’s beginners guide to the Moon landings with the added help of his Lego Saturn V. It focuses on the ‘how’ of getting to the Moon and back again. Please feel free to like/share/pass on to anyone who might be interested! Alastair is currently an astronomer at the Royal Observatory Edinburgh.

Jasper: Space Dog
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Jasper: Space Dog

Released to mark the 50th anniversary of the moon landings, Jasper Space Dog cleverly weaves facts about space missions with hilarious ideas about space. In their quest, Charlie Tanner and his dog, Jasper, consult space experts to see if Jasper might make history too. Several considerations regarding the design and layout of Jasper Space Dog…

How to Spot the Apollo 11 Landing Site
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How to Spot the Apollo 11 Landing Site

The most accessible wonder of the night sky is our Moon. If you have some binoculars, or a small telescope, you’ll quickly notice that the Moon is full of intriguing details, but even with just the naked eye, you can see some fascinating features – including the area where the first Moon landing took place!…

Google Moon
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Google Moon

Google has teamed up with NASA’s Ames Research Centre in Silicon Valley, California, to create Google Moon to allow people across the Earth to explore the Moon. www.google.co.uk/moon

Paxi and our Moon: Phases and Eclipses
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Paxi and our Moon: Phases and Eclipses

In this short animation Paxi, the friendly alien from Space, explores our moon. Paxi looks at the orbit of the Moon and explains the phases of the moon as seen from the Northern and Southern hemispheres. The animation also highlights key concepts related to the moon and demonstrates how solar and lunar eclipses occur. www.stem.org.uk/rxfmuv

Diameter of the Moon
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Diameter of the Moon

In this activity, students use similar triangles to estimate the diameter of the moon. www.stem.org.uk/rx353c

The Rotating Moon
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The Rotating Moon

This animated clip explains how we always see the same side of the Moon and that the Moon used to spin much faster and has since become gravitationally tidally locked to the Earth. This is the case with most moons within the solar system. www.stem.org.uk/rx33u7

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